Book Blogging Over the Years

Coffee in one hand, Kindle in the other.

A post shared by Chachic (@chachickenpie) on

I’ve been book blogging since 2010. That’s seven years of being active in the online book community. That’s longer than any romantic relationship that I’ve had and even longer than any of my work stints in each of the companies I’ve worked for. πŸ˜‚ I keep doing it not because I earn any money from it, but because it’s so much fun to interact with fellow book lovers and authors, to discuss books with people who get you. Over the years, I’ve tried to influence family and friends to read books and I’ve been successful with some of them… but they’re not book nerds like book bloggers are. There are also fellow book bloggers who have become wonderful friends, and some of those have become more than just “online” friendships. I’ve met some of them in person when I traveled abroad and even the ones I don’t think I’ll ever meet, I’ve been comfortable enough with them to share more than just book updates. In a previous post, I mentioned that I feel like I have a sense of belonging in the online book community because I feel like I’ve carved out a niche for myself. I will keep doing this as long as it keeps me happy. And what makes me happy and engaged and excited to talk about books has changed from when I first started.

When I first started blogging about books, most of the posts that I made and the interactions that I had were through my blog (this WordPress site right here). I used to blog daily then it became weekly then it became monthly. Now I’d be happy if I manage to publish one post every month. There was a time when I would feel guilty about this, but like I’ve said plenty of times before, I want to keep my bookish interactions fun and part of that is blogging when I feel like it. I used to think that the reason why I didn’t blog as much was because I was busy – with work, with chores, with my social life. But now I understand that it has increasingly become more difficult to open my laptop and sit down to write a post. I don’t know why this is, maybe because being on apps on a smartphone just makes things easier? Or maybe because opening up a laptop feels too much like work, and blogging is something that I don’t want to feel like work. So now I’ve learned to not be too hard on myself. My WordPress blog will always be here whenever I’m in the mood to type out a post. I will keep updating my yearly posts like best books I’ve read in the year or my favorite fictional couples. But for more stream of consciousness type of updates, I’m on Twitter and Litsy (username: Chachic) on a daily basis, and Instagram whenever I feel like updating it. I know social media apps are not everyone’s cup of tea so please feel free to comment on any of my posts or send me a direct message in any of the apps I mentioned or an email if you feel like just chatting. πŸ™‚

What about you, what are the things that you’ve done to keep blogging fun? Is it also easier for you to interact using bookish apps? Or do you prefer something more personal like sending an email or messaging directly?

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15 thoughts on “Book Blogging Over the Years

  1. I can’t believe you’ve been blogging since 2010! I thought I’d been around a while because I started my blog in 2014 πŸ˜‚πŸ™ˆ

  2. I too am finding it more easy to get my book community fix from social media, and the blog feels less urgent to me. Back in the day, the blog was the main way people knew who you were, and that’s just not the case so much now, unless there’s a whole new world of bloggers who started more recently who have made that sort of community for themselves? The thing I miss about the Good Old Days is making new blogging friends; I don’t come across new bloggers much at all anymore.

    • Good to know that you feel the same way, Charlotte! I’m not sure if there’s a whole generation of new bloggers who still use their blogs as their main site. There are so many different sites that are utilized now like Youtube (booktubers) and Instagram (bookstagrammers). I stick with Twitter and Litsy, and have made some new bookish friends there, not necessarily fellow book bloggers but we do talk about books. I’ve gotten some recommendations from them that I wouldn’t have picked up otherwise.

  3. Great post, I have been blogging since July, 2009. I also feel I am part of a great community, the international book blog world. Blogging also helps impose a kind of discipline on me as I try to blog almost daily. I have learned of 100s of writers via blog contacts, interviewed about 100 writers.

    • Wow, that’s awesome that you get to blog DAILY! Yes, I agree that it’s the community that helps motivate me. I enjoy connecting with fellow book lovers all over the world.

  4. This is such a great post!! Blogging is fun but I sometimes feel pressure to be really interesting (probably more interesting than I actually am) and psych myself out of writing a post.My favourite places to talk with other people about books are Goodreads and Instagram. I love the groups on Goodreads, people are so friendly and chatty.

    • Yes, blogging is definitely fun but it requires so much effort! And some days, you’re really just not in the mood to sit down and work on blog posts. I used to be a lot more active on Goodreads but most of my friends have stopped using it, and I mostly use it as a database to keep track of the books I buy and read. I get more bookish discussions and interactions on Litsy and Instagram nowadays. People are also very friendly and easy to talk to on those platforms.😊

Comments are like chocolate. :) Maraming salamat / thank you! I try my best to reply to all the comments on my blog.

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